RF
edwardian-time-machine:

November 1909 Vogue magazine cover
Source

edwardian-time-machine:

November 1909 Vogue magazine cover

Source

elsalupin:

Sleeping Beauty redesign for sketch dailies on twitter

elsalupin:

Sleeping Beauty redesign for sketch dailies on twitter

arsenicinshell:

Interior of rococo period Pullman car. late 1800s

arsenicinshell:

Interior of rococo period Pullman car. late 1800s

asylum-art:

Persephone by Mario Ville (Kattaca)

Photo: Alvaro Villarrubia
Stylists: Mario Ville (Kattaca)
Make up & Hairdresser: Rocio Cuenca
Model: Didi Maquiaveli
Assistant: Antonio Velasco

The dowager empress and I love the Russian ballet. We never miss it!

beatonna:

itscolossal:

Tiny Embroidered Animals by Chloe Giordano

lovely

inside-the-dark-matter:

Portrait of Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier and his Wife (1788) — Jacques-Louis David

inside-the-dark-matter:

Portrait of Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier and his Wife (1788)

Jacques-Louis David

forties-fifties-sixties-love:

Inside a dressing room at Paris’ Moulin Rouge, 1924

forties-fifties-sixties-love:

Inside a dressing room at Paris’ Moulin Rouge, 1924

claireonacloud:

My first book, ONCE UPON A CLOUD with Dial Press at Penguin is finally finished! Its up for preorder -here- and will be in stores in Spring 2015. These are some of the pages of characters little Celeste meets in the story. 

pagewoman:

Haddon Hall in Derbyshire by UGArdener on Flickr

pagewoman:

Haddon Hall in Derbyshire by UGArdener on Flickr

joachimmurat:

I know we in our sensible times tend to find the (up to the)Victorian period habit of making jewellery out of people’s hair kind of gross

but you have to admit

Some of it is

pretty fucking impressive.

non-westernhistoricalfashion:

Armlet (bazuband)
First half of 19th century
Iran

The David Collection:

Armlets were used by both men and women in India and Iran from the 17th century. They especially took the form of jeweled bands, and a princely bazuband could hold numerous and large gemstones, as we can see on the miniature on the front of this armlet. According to the inscription, it depicts Prince Tahmasp Mirza, grandson of the ruling Fath Ali Shah. The portrait of the shah’s son, Muhammad Ali Mirza, is on the armlet’s pendant, which does not belong to the museum. As Muhammad Ali Mirza was governor of Kermansha, the two bazubands were probably worn by one of the Qajar family’s faithful subjects in this Iranian province.